(Source: tiredinfant, via skeetshoot)

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via catdad)

“I want to call for a time of accountability and specificity: not all LGBT youth are suicidal, not all LGBT people are subject to violence and bullying, and indeed class and race remain much more vital factors in accounting for vulnerability to violence, police brutality, social baiting and reduced access to education and career opportunities. Let’s call an end to the finger snapping moralism, let’s question contemporary desires for immediately consumable messages of progress, development and access; let’s all take a hard long look at the privileges that often prop up public performances of grief and outrage; let’s acknowledge that being queer no longer automatically means being brutalized and let’s argue for much more situated claims to marginalization, trauma and violence. Let’s not fiddle while Rome (or Paris) burns, trigger while the water rises, weep while trash piles up; let’s recognize these internal wars for the distraction they have become. Once upon a time, the appellation ‘queer’ named an opposition to identity politics, a commitment to coalition, a vision of alternative worlds. Now it has become a weak umbrella term for a confederation of identitarian concerns. It is time to move on, to confuse the enemy, to become illegible, invisible, anonymous (see Preciado’s Bully Bloggers post on anonymity in relation to the Zapatistas). In the words of José Muñoz, ‘we have never been queer.’ In the words of a great knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail, ‘we are now no longer the Knights who say Ni, we are now the Knights who say “Ekki-ekki-ekki-ekki-PTANG. Zoom-Boing, z’nourrwringmm.”’”

coketalk:

"An Illustrated Guide to American Personhood" by Sarah Baker

coketalk:

"An Illustrated Guide to American Personhood" by Sarah Baker


cotard-delusion:

Antony and the Johnsons - Another World

(via catdad)

“As Iraq descends into chaos again, more than a decade after ‘Mission Accomplished,’ media commentators and politicians have mostly agreed upon calling the war a ‘mistake.’ But the ‘mistake’ rhetoric is the language of denial, not contrition: it minimizes the Iraq War’s disastrous consequences, removes blame, and deprives Americans of any chance to learn from our generation’s foreign policy disaster. The Iraq War was not a ‘mistake’ — it resulted from calculated deception. The painful, unvarnished fact is that we were lied to. Now is the time to have the willingness to say that.”